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Optalysys technology has the potential to produce engineering and scientific model simulations at speeds and resolutions far beyond the capabilities of traditional computers.

Weather turbulance

storm clouds

Scenario:

Weather turbulence modelling uses a technique called Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) to calculate air flow at very small scales. This is a very demanding process and even with the most advanced processing capabilities it can take weeks to calculate the flow over just a few seconds.

How Optalysys technology can help:

Optical principles are analogous to those used in the DNS models but the calculations are performed in parallel at the speed of light. This means there is potential for Optalysys technology to perform simulations at orders of magnitude faster than today’s capabilities and at much higher resolutions.

F1 car design

f1 car

Scenario:

In Formula 1, the impact of airflow and heat transfer on a new car or part design are modelled on a computer before committing to test scale models in a wind tunnel. Some teams perform all their tests on computers and do not use wind tunnels at all. It can take several hours or even days for today’s computers to perform these calculations and in practice the computer model is usually periodically suspended and data downloaded and sampled for offline processing.

How Optalysys technology can help:

With the step-change in processing power that Optalysys technology will provide, secondary data is produced and analysed at the same time as the model is being calculated and all of the data is analysed rather than just a sample. Additionally a real-time graphical representation of the flow can be generated. Results from the analysis is immediately fed back into the model and used to adjust further calculations.

Jet engines

jet engine

Scenario:

Computational Fluid Dynamics is used in the design of jet engines to model airflow and heat transfer. The design is first modelled on a computer before committing resources to building and testing a scale model in a wind tunnel. These simulations can take several hours or days to perform and during the processing, the model is periodically suspended and Gigabytes of data is downloaded for secondary, offline processing. From each snapshot of flow data produced, a sample is harvested since the amount of post-processing involved to study all the data is impractical to process in detail.

How Optalysys technology can help:

With the technology Optalysys is developing, all of the data is analysed rather than just a sample. Secondary data is produced and analysed as the model is calculated. This is illustrated through a real-time graphical representation of the flow, highlighting any small scale or transient effects that might occur that would otherwise be missed. Furthermore, the results are fed back into the model to influence how the simulation is calculated from that point.

Ocean movements

Scenario:

Most large ocean ships carry wide-sweeping sensors to determine the height of waves. However, the computing power available is not sufficient to model the fast-moving fluctuations of the ocean quickly enough in real-time to detect potential hazards. This leads to a serious risk of rogue monster waves and undetected severe weather conditions which can cause significant damage to the ships and crew.

How Optalysys technology can help:

The step change in processing power that Optalysys will provide will support real-time, high resolution graphical representations of the changing ocean conditions on the vessels. Results can be immediately fed back into the model and used to suggest alternative routes or trigger other precautionary measures.

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Welcome to the Optalysys December 2016 Newsletter – your regular update on the latest developments in optical computing.  In this edition we cover our participation at supercomputing conference SC16 in Salt Lake City, UT, USA, an announcement that we have been accepted to present a demonstration at the bioinformatics conference AGBT in February 2017 in Miami, FL, USA, […]

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Millie Harrison has joined the Optalysys team as Administration Assistant.  She studied at Minsthorpe Community College (a specialist Science College) and went on to complete an apprenticeship in level 2 Business and Administration from 2014 to 2016 with a publishing company, where she was offered a permanent position. Millie’s ambition is to always achieve high standards […]

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